Philippa

Graphene

For those of you who have any technical background this material will blow you away, if you haven’t already had that experience from prior knowledge of it. It blew me away at the time.

What is Graphene?

Not to be confused with Graphite, Grapheme, Graphane, or Graphyne.

File:Graphen.jpg

Graphene is an atomic-scale hexagonal lattice made of carbon atoms.

Graphene is an allotrope (form) of carbon consisting of a one layer thick hexagonal lattice with one atom at each vertex. It is the basic structural element of many other allotropes of carbon, such as graphite, charcoal, carbon nanotubes and fullerenes.

Graphene and its band structure and Dirac cones, effect of a grid on doping

It can be considered as an indefinitely large aromatic molecule, the ultimate case of the family of flat polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graphene

Take the trouble to log into Manchester University’s web site to read about the discovery and watch their videos Really fascinating. This is where it all began.

Graphene is a new 2D material which was isolated in 2004. It was discovered after scientists at The University of Manchester, England, separated one atomic layer of graphite using simple sticky tape.

Graphene was first isolated by Prof Sir Andre Geim and Prof Sir Kostya Novoselov at The University of Manchester. It is the thinnest material known and yet also one of the strongest. It conducts electricity as efficiently as copper and outperforms all other materials as a conductor of heat. Graphene is almost completely transparent, yet so dense that even the smallest atom helium cannot pass through it.

The uses of graphene are limitless and because of its multi-functional properties, graphene can be used in thousands of different applications.

Sporting goods, technology and motor vehicles are just a few of the applications that can be improved with graphene. The constant research being done every day is quickly proving that graphene is truly the material of the future.

Graphene’s flexibility could be used in emerging technologies such as rollerball computers, heat sensitive clothing and flexible phones.

Graphene allows light to pass through it very easily, meaning that we could see TVs built into windows and Sat Navs built into car windscreens in the future of electronics.

One of graphene’s most dynamic properties is its remarkable thinness. At just one atom thick, graphene is so thin that it is extremely flexible and conducts heat and electricity extremely well. To put it into context, graphene is about one million times thinner than a human hair.

Graphene’s thinness lends itself perfectly for the development of future technology. Its high conductivity makes it perfect for aiding in CPU cooling and creating more efficient graphene technology.

Graphene is the strongest material known to man – more than 200 times stronger than steel and stronger than diamonds. The strength of graphene could be used in composites and coatings for applications such as the aerospace and automotive industries.

See: http://www.graphene.manchester.ac.uk/

 

Philippa

The Haircut

One day a florist went to a barber for a haircut. After the cut, he
asked about his bill, and the barber replied, ‘I cannot accept money
from you; I’m doing community service this week.’ The florist was
pleased and left the shop. When the barber went to open his shop the
next morning, there was a ‘thank you’ card and a dozen roses waiting for
him at his door.

Later, a cop comes in for a haircut, and when he tries to pay his bill,
the barber again replied, ‘I cannot accept money from you; I’m doing
community service this week.’ The cop was happy and left the shop. The
next morning when the barber went to open up, there was a ‘thank you’
card and a dozen doughnuts waiting for him at his door.

Then an MP came in for a haircut, and when he went to pay his bill, the
barber again replied, ‘I cannot accept money from you. I’m doing
community service this week.’ The MP was very happy and left the shop.
The next morning, when the barber went to open up, there were a dozen
MPs lined up waiting for a free haircut.

And that, my friends, illustrates the fundamental difference between the
citizens of our country and the politicians who run it.

BOTH POLITICIANS AND NAPPIES NEED TO BE CHANGED OFTEN,
AND FOR THE SAME REASON!

ER

untie the knot

Dear Reader,

After the Brexit referendum Glynsky and I debated a lot. We were equally surprised to learn, Glynsky was pro Brexit, and I was against. Not that I had a vote.

After a few arguments, which got quite heated, we agreed to disagree. The always wise Glynsky ended our debate with: “Nobody can predict the future.” I agreed, of course.

Ever since I have been following the news about Brexit. And with news I mean the facts, not the cacophony of opinions, wishes, dreaming, infighting, and inflated egos.

I watched the rising prices in the UK, the continuing losses of jobs, the 32% drop in M&A deals, the decline of real estate value, the downgrading of the UK credit rating by Moody’s. And Brexit hit close to home. Family members, working in the UK for international organizations, were told to look for other positions within their organizations, but outside the UK.

During our debates Glynsky said, the EU needs the UK as much as the UK needs the EU. When challenged, he referred to the EURO clearing and the bond market at London Stock Exchange, and the transatlantic cables to the US. He considered those “must haves” for the EU. That was roughly 15 months ago.

In the meantime the Deutsche Boerse in Frankfurt started offering lower commission on EURO clearing. And the EU started the process for a new law, requiring EURO clearing to happen within the EURO zone.

Plus, an insider told me, the German state of Hesse wants its own direct cable from NYC, across the Atlantic, through the rivers Rhine and Main, directly into Frankfurt.

I interpret these actions, more than anything else, that the EU is preparing for what is called a hard Brexit.

Stay tuned,

Engine Room

ER

Subscriptions

Dear Reader,

Over the last couple of weeks DiaBlog gained an unusual number of new subscribers. As flattering as that might be, hundreds of subscriptions were left unconfirmed. Meaning, an email address subscribed to receive diablog posts, but the person owning that email address did not confirm the subscription, when asked to do so.

Our system requires confirmation, because anyone can fill out the subscription form, even a bot But only the person with access to the email inbox can confirm that subscription. That way we do not spam people.

As a precaution I deleted all subscriptions lacking confirmation.

Should you be affected, please subscribe again. And please make sure, you confirm your subscription. We prefer to have fewer subscribers, rather than spamming people.

Thanks in advance,

Engine Room

Philippa

New Senior’s Exam

You only need 4 correct out of 10 questions to pass.

1) How long did the Hundred Years’ War last?
2) Which country makes Panama hats?

3) From which animal do we get cat gut?

4) In which month do Russians celebrate the October Revolution?

5) What is a camel’s hair brush made of?

6) The Canary Islands in the Pacific are named after what animal?

7) What was King George VI’s first name?

8) What color is a purple finch?

9) Where are Chinese gooseberries from?

10) What is the color of the black box in a commercial airplane?

 

Remember, you need only 4 correct answers to pass, but it’s not as easy as you may be thinking. I’ll come back tomorrow and give you the answers.

ANSWERS TO THE QUIZ
1) How long did the Hundred Years War last? 116 years
2) Which country makes Panama hats? Ecuador
3) From which animal do we get cat gut? Sheep and Horses
4) In which month do Russians celebrate the October Revolution? November
5) What is a camel’s hair brush made of? Squirrel fur
6) The Canary Islands in the Pacific are named after what animal? Dogs
7) What was King George VI’s first name? Albert
8 ) What color is a purple finch? Crimson
9) Where are Chinese gooseberries from? New Zealand
10) What is the color of the black box in a commercial airplane?  Orange (of course)
What do you mean, you failed?