ER

untie the knot

Dear Reader,

After the Brexit referendum Glynsky and I debated a lot. We were equally surprised to learn, Glynsky was pro Brexit, and I was against. Not that I had a vote.

After a few arguments, which got quite heated, we agreed to disagree. The always wise Glynsky ended our debate with: “Nobody can predict the future.” I agreed, of course.

Ever since I have been following the news about Brexit. And with news I mean the facts, not the cacophony of opinions, wishes, dreaming, infighting, and inflated egos.

I watched the rising prices in the UK, the continuing losses of jobs, the 32% drop in M&A deals, the decline of real estate value, the downgrading of the UK credit rating by Moody’s. And Brexit hit close to home. Family members, working in the UK for international organizations, were told to look for other positions within their organizations, but outside the UK.

During our debates Glynsky said, the EU needs the UK as much as the UK needs the EU. When challenged, he referred to the EURO clearing and the bond market at London Stock Exchange, and the transatlantic cables to the US. He considered those “must haves” for the EU. That was roughly 15 months ago.

In the meantime the Deutsche Boerse in Frankfurt started offering lower commission on EURO clearing. And the EU started the process for a new law, requiring EURO clearing to happen within the EURO zone.

Plus, an insider told me, the German state of Hesse wants its own direct cable from NYC, across the Atlantic, through the rivers Rhine and Main, directly into Frankfurt.

I interpret these actions, more than anything else, that the EU is preparing for what is called a hard Brexit.

Stay tuned,

Engine Room

ER

Subscriptions

Dear Reader,

Over the last couple of weeks DiaBlog gained an unusual number of new subscribers. As flattering as that might be, hundreds of subscriptions were left unconfirmed. Meaning, an email address subscribed to receive diablog posts, but the person owning that email address did not confirm the subscription, when asked to do so.

Our system requires confirmation, because anyone can fill out the subscription form, even a bot But only the person with access to the email inbox can confirm that subscription. That way we do not spam people.

As a precaution I deleted all subscriptions lacking confirmation.

Should you be affected, please subscribe again. And please make sure, you confirm your subscription. We prefer to have fewer subscribers, rather than spamming people.

Thanks in advance,

Engine Room

ER

Blue eye for Bluetooth

Dear Reader,

Posts about computers are not very popular on diablog. One could even say, they are unpopular. Yet, for your own safety, please, bare with me.

One of the reasons for the lack of popularity might be, that a lot of people are unaware, how often they are using a “computer”.

Prime example, do you use a smartphone? Great, that’s a computer. Do you own a smart TV? That’s a computer. And so is your car, and probably you fridge, and your internet router, and your electricity and/or gas meter, and, and ….

Why do I bother you with that? Because today it was revealed that Bluetooth has major security holes.

Blue what?

Bluetooth is a wireless technique invented in 1994, 23 years ago. It is in use heavily. Bluetooth is in almost all smartphones and laptops. For years now it has been bundled with WiFi on the hardware level. So Bluetooth is pretty much everywhere.

And today a research company published security holes in Bluetooth. Unfortunately, Bluetooth did not go with what is called “Opt-in”, where you have to activate it. Bluetooth is active by default. You have to ppt-out, so to speak.

If you own a laptop or a smartphone, please turn off Bluetooth.

 

If you do not know how, please ask someone who does.

You and we all will have enough problems with all the “internet of things” devices, where one cannot turn off Bluetooth easily. We do not want a gazillion hacked smartphones and laptops on top of that, do we?

Please, do it now.

Thanks in advance,

Engine Room

ER

This weekend

Dear Reader,

Everybody here at diablog is wondering, where the heck is Glynsky?

Maybe I have an answer.

This weekend is Goodwood. Somehow I forgot, whether Glynsky attends Silverstone, or Goodwood, or both?

In any case, this year you, I, and everybody else can follow Goodwood via live stream. It all is on Youtube and one can watch it here:

Goodwood Revival Live Stream 2017

If you happen to see Glynsky in the crowd or on the track, let me know.

Stay tuned,

Engine Room

 

ER

Watch The Walk

Dear Reader,

The last few years have been pretty hard on movie goers like me.

I understand the need for children movies, but how many Disney princesses can one watch?

I also understand the reason for action movies, but no story line and eight sequels?

Obviously the new players in the fight for our eyeballs – Amazon, Netflix, .. is HBO still around? – have taken bigger risks and attracted better stories, creating better movie experiences at home, outside your normal cinema. But then, if your competition is a gazillion Marvel and kiddy films, it does not take much, does it?

One movie stood out in 2015, and sadly I did not manage to watch it then. A few days ago I was able to do so, and I can truly recommend it. If you have a chance, please go and see:

The Walk

If you cannot see it on the big screen, it is worth renting a beamer for this. The cinematography is that excellent.

The movie tells Philippe Petit’s story, a French guy who wanted to walk on a wire – more like a cable – between the twin towers of the World Trade Center. The pictures are brilliant, the story is very well told, it has you gripping your arm rests. Or getting sweaty palms, when he steps onto the cable.

The movie also brings back fond memories of standing up there, overlooking Manhattan, your spirits and dreams uplifted.

Stay tuned,

Engine Room

 

ER

Bad luck – good luck

Dear Reader,

My love for espresso is well documented here on Diablog. A few weeks ago my espresso machine died. First the gasket went. I had pushed too much, my fault. Yet, after some hustle I bought a new gasket from a small lovely store. The gaskets I had ordered online previously never arrived. So much for that.

Nevertheless, replacing the seal was easy and things were fine again. I was back on my drug.

And then the machine died for good. The on/off switch did not work properly anymore, and steam was coming out of strange places. This was far beyond my repair capabilities. And after almost six years of constant use, I was not too sad. Remember, I had paid a mere $20 for it.

When I had bought the gasket, the shop owner informed me, that what I thought was an AEG machine was in fact a DeLonghi. It seems, DeLonghi is selling its espresso makers under various labels, like Krups, AEG and what not.

So this time DeLoghi machines were included in my flea market hunt for a new/old machine.

And my luck, I found:

a DeLonghi ECP31 at a bargain of $25.

It is dead simple, easy to use, has high pressure of 15bar, and most importantly makes absolutely delicious espresso.

Bonus, when a friend dropped off the old machine at the recycling center, one of the employees asked to have it for repair.

Consider me a very happy camper again, going to make an espresso now,

Engine Room